Gun Makers Profit from USA’s Culture of Violence

Shameless Profiteering After Sandy Hook Massacre

Juana Carrasaco Martín

THE response was to be expected, a timely entrepreneurial one, meant to reap profit and create a ‘need’ to consume: buy a bulletproof backpack for your little one. Good businessmen don’t miss an opportunity.

This kind of protection from the criminal minds of a sick society has occurred to companies like Amendment II, a cynically selected name referring to the U.S. Constitution’s Second Amendment which grants private citizens the right to bear arms, 300 million of whom, within a population of 350 million, do so.

Six months ago, the company introduced three different backpack models, one for teenagers, somberly colored black and gray, looking much like a casket. Another model bears images of the Avengers, characters in a violent cartoon series, and the third is decorated with Disney princesses.

Amendment II has reportedly tripled its sales since the Newtown massacre, in which 20 children, six and seven years of age, and six adults lost their lives, each one shot several times.

This is not the only company interested in ‘protecting’ students and is not, of course, the only one taking advantage of the commotion. Following the Colombine shooting, for example, a similar outfit named Bullet Blocker emerged.

Prices vary according to the brand and model, $199 for the least expensive, others as high as $300. Of course, the most expensive are the children’s models, those sporting princesses, elves and cute baby animals, since protecting a child, “is priceless.”

Nevertheless while some profit from sales of bulletproof vests and backpacks, others, in the interest of protection, offer another option for that special gift – a gun.

In a culture of violence, nothing is more normal than considering these two solutions, bulletproof vests and, at the same time, more bullets. Nor is it unusual for parents to teach and train their children to shoot.

Nancy Lanza was one of the adults killed by her own son, Adam Lanza, along with 20 young students at Sandy Hook Elementary. The three weapons used by the 20-year old to repeatedly shoot his victims were registered in her name.

While the United States attempts to deal with this chaos, other sons of the country are shooting children at close range in Afghanistan and Pakistan. No one sees these bodies, since these children are no one’s relatives. They fall in remote villages in the mountains, killed by drones controlled by young soldiers sitting safely inside a room filled with cutting edge technology, pushing buttons as if it were a video game.

In this case, it is state terror, in the others, a private matter…

This chaos is about creating paranoia and about war. The winners are members of the military-industrial-media complex who have taken war to their own streets.

Nancy Lanza was a follower of the U.S. survivalist movement, which is growing. Her house was a fortress, armed with five weapons and stocked with basic goods, since, according to the movement’s philosophy, social chaos will soon give way to the collapse of the economy.

The United States is shaken, but no law modifying the right to bear arms, given current circumstances, has been introduced. On the contrary, a Republican Representative in Congress commented that the tragedy in Sandy Hook could have been avoided if the staff had access to weapons to defend themselves and their students.

The madness persists, officially and privately, with backpacks and guns. (Juventud Rebelde)

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One thought on “Gun Makers Profit from USA’s Culture of Violence

  1. Pingback: Duck and cover: Back to the future « educationalchemy

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